Ad Spot

Our View: Time to take Mississippi’s education crisis seriously

The recent oversight by the Mississippi Department of Education and lawmakers illustrates there’s still a long way to go before the state’s educational crisis is taken seriously.

When the state legislature announced it failed to appropriate enough funds to provide much-needed raises to educators who focus on the students needing the most attention, residents were rightfully outraged. Oxford and Lafayette County Schools alone were shorted almost $200,000 out of a total of $14 billion.

That’s $200,000 our special education, gifted and career-technical teachers are deprived of, in a state where approximately 75 percent of students will enter the workforce after graduating high school.

Oxford and Lafayette County are lucky enough to be two of the highest-performing school districts in the state and have both pledged to make up for the state’s shortcomings in time. It’s a call they shouldn’t have to make, one that will leave major holes in their operating budgets, which cover salaries, utility bills and more. It’s not an easy error to correct and, as LCSD Superintendent Adam Pugh told the EAGLE, it will be a “huge hit” to the district.

Being perennially in last place has become a punchline for too long. It’s up to us, the constituents, to do more. Our children are the future, and they deserve an education they can not only be proud of, but will also lead to a quality career at a livable wage in-state.

There’s a variety of ways to add value to our schools where public education funding falls short. Local business owners can partner with schools on student internships and job shadowing. They can donate machinery for students to learn to work on, equipping them with a valuable skill straight out of the gate.

Parents, take a more active role in your child’s school district. Attend public meetings, volunteer as you’re able and take time to invest in your child’s education right at home.

Most importantly, don’t forget every citizen’s ultimate power: the right to vote. This election year, pay close attention to candidates’ stances on education, and decide for yourselves if it’s acceptable. Remember this $14 billion mistake at the polls and do your part to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

It’s time for voters to stop accepting the ‘one step forward, two steps back’ approach, especially when it comes to educating Mississippi’s children.

Education

University of Mississippi employee and student test positive for COVID-19

News

Lafayette County Woman to celebrate 101st birthday

Events

Peaceful March to take place on Thursday in Oxford

Events

Oxford Film Festival to hold pop up drive-in this summer

Events

Chamber of Commerce cancels LOU 4th of July celebrations

Lafayette County

Supervisors approve park on Weems Elementary site

Business

Baptist Hospital to ‘keep team together’ as hospitals announce layoffs nationwide

Crime

Bond set for accused vandal of Ole Miss Confederate monument

Business

Square Books to reopen doors June 1

News

Boyce: Change means ‘moving the monument away from the center of our campus’

News

Aldermen vote to begin Phase II of Oxford’s recovery plan

Crime

Ole Miss statue vandalism suspect identified

Lafayette County

Peaceful Protest held at City Hall Saturday

Crime

Ole Miss Confederate Statue vandalized

Coronavirus Heroes

Coronavirus Heroes Part 5: Teresa Adams, Leap Frog continue to educate despite challenges

Lafayette County

By the Numbers: Lafayette County unemployment rates increase

Business

The End of All Music finding ways to thrive in a pandemic

Business

Oxford Tuesday Morning not in first round of closures

Lafayette County

Circuit Judge John A. Gregory announces retirement

Crime

Abbeville man arrested after shooting

Lafayette County

MDOT provides update on Highway 6 projects

Events

Conference on the Front Porch announces 2020 lineup

Lafayette County

Lafayette County distributing KN95 masks to public

Lafayette County

Verizon Cell Tower approved by Lafayette County Planning Commission